Igloo

Good Morning Brave hearts

Wake up to a day of architectural delights. Fascinating domains from our cold climate. The perfect dome shape of carved snow, of barking dogs and aurora borealis brilliance, to start the morning off right. Add endless darkness, sub zero temperatures, a little wind chill and here’s the start of a great day in the far north.
Brave human, a day of reckoning with severe climate, possibly predators and elusive game makes today a day of challenge for the Arctic champions of survival. During the darkest months of the year, when the cold is the deepest and the snow is the highest, those tiny domes in the snow, protected small villages of independent and high spirited individuals, who saw the great north as a frontier, called home.

http://www.eskimold.com/uploads/3/1/4/1/3141575/2_a_history_of_igloos.pdf

Way back in far off history, tells a time of human migration throughout Asia to Canada. People were mobile and robust, following herds of game animals, in search of food. Following the call of the wild, to the daunting task of immigration and settlement, of the new frontier, of the far north.
These ingenious people with inventive minds, created the dwelling of snow for shelter and habitation. The landed migrants of Asia, set up domiciles of snow, igloos, to house themselves, during the long winter’s cold. A snow house of warmth and comfort, easy to build, with readily available building materials.
High up in the Arctic tundra, above the treeline, where wood is sparse or non-existent, remains the ancestors of those ancient pioneers. Settlers to the far north with courage and creativity, the daring human, with perseverance and skills, tackled a task of bold survival in extremely harsh conditions and carved a niche of humanity, in a land of constant challenge.
Out on the barren landscape, stands a village of domes. An Inuit village of igloos, carved from compacted snow and filled with an Inuit family and their precious belongings. Furs to sleep on, whale oil for light and cooking, utensils and tools. The daily awakening to a wind swept view of barren, snow covered land. To temperatures dropping to more than -40 and to the more chilling need for food.
Feed the hungry, great hunters. The caribou roam in herds and the walrus plays in the ocean. Yours is a land of extremes. A call to the will of the indomitable human.
Bravo to you, almighty human and to the will of survival. To your place in our history and to your perfect domes, the igloo, on our list of the seven wonders of Canada.
written by Dr, Louise Hayes
January 10, 2014

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The Case, page 5

Good Day, you awesome human

Generations of internal peace and prosperity have left this land to you. Praises to you for the great peace of our ancestors and for the quiet calm of harmony. The brilliant diversity of multi-culturalism has enriched our lives and brought peace to thousands.

The Canadian cultural landscape is filled with diversity. The sharing of the richness of heredity is a gift. A gift of knowledge, intelligence and beauty. The preservation of such gifts is a national dream. Our national treasures aquaint us with the mysteries of the great planet. The mystery of bio diversity, of the human, of the ancient past. Our aptitudes thrive in such a land, building, sharing and preservation. The great gift of today comes from a past of diligence, daring, nurture and care. Each careful step to the fulfillment of a dream. A land of beauty and prosperity.
Brave fur traders, sensible exchange, hearty pioneers, diligent work. The work ethics of our past is the reward of our present. The safety and security of our culture is the preservation of the dignity of our ancestors. They came, they rose to the challenge and they achieved.
Generations of the family farm brings us national pride. No destruction, no despair. The endless call to finer produce, finer meat, finer farming. The endless call to feed the nation, to feed the starving. The diligence to the craft. Build a better product and save the hungry.
A noble cause from caring business enterprise. A commonplace cause in yesteryear, commonplace in the 1800’s, but not so much now. Our dependence upon those few who try, increases as cities fill, shopping malls increase and retail, merchandise and commerce become the more sought after way of life. Fewer and fewer farms to feed the growing masses of the multitudes of humanity in this country. Fewer and fewer people whose talents and skills lie with the land.
Immigration is steady. It brings many gifts. Culture, recreation, connections to countries abroad. It brings a demand for international relations, for products and services to fulfill the needs of newcomers. Cities swell, urban areas develop, the demand for food product increases, but the family farm diminishes. Of the thousands who enter the country, few leave the cities, few choose to farm.
Of all of our nations wealth and prosperity, where will we be without food.

http://www.gofundme.com/FarmedAndDangerous

The family farm is in decline. Mishaps that cause alarm resound in our ears. The food chain is threatened. This is not just a case about sheep. The other animals are gone as well. This is a case about a farm. A Canadian farm. An industry in decline in Canada. An industry that helped to build a strong and healthy population, a strong and healthy nation. An industry first and foremost in our minds. Food.
Our negotiations cannot fail.
written by Dr. Louise Hayes
November 30,2013