The Case, page 4

Good morning, brave hearts

A day to call your own. A day of well spent pleasure, of pursuits of intelligence and excellence. A day in the life of the great planet that gives you joy and prosperity. Hail to you, almighty human for the joy and achievements of this day.

For you, the family farm might be a lifetime away. A thought in your mind as you feast upon the daily harvest and shop amongst the worlds finest negotiations. Food on your plate, no starvation, good health, good nutrition and commonplace abundance. Lucky you, great human, for the commonplace prosperity of this land.
The family farm is the lifeline of our nation. It brings security and prosperity to us in the form of high quality farm goodness that sustains us with healthful produce. The fresh quality food, high in vitamin and mineral content protects our bodies and gives us strength. The family farm, a vital key in our survival, is our lifeline to survival.
Aptitudes of animal husbandry, crop production and the joy of the land.
For those people who enter into the farming business enter with gladness. The business and its necessity are obvious. The work is constant, the reward is fulfilling. The healthy farm and its wholesome product is a passion of business, sharing, nurture and care.
The occasional mishap becomes a public outcry of save us! Save us from disease, from blight, from nutritional deficiency, from crop failure, from lost variety and starvation. The interruption of the food chain is a genuine loss of contentment. The loss of carefully cultivated genetics is a loss of cultural heritage.

http://fullcomment.nationalpost.com/2012/04/13/marni-soupcoff-the-cfia-shouldnt-be-leading-montana-joness-lambs-to-the-slaughter/

An unusual case. The plight of a shepherdess and the loss of generations of careful Canadian selection, breeding, heritage sheep and cultural heritage. The loss of livelihood and passion. All for an animal, an infected animal, a diseased creature that did not reside on this farm. An animal who resided 1500 miles away. An animal that developed a disease which it would only spread to each other, not to other livestock or humans. An animal that was destroyed 1500 miles away after being diagnosed with a disease called scrapie, which infects sheep and goats.
None of the animals in her possession had the disease.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Scrapie

An unusual case. No disease amongst the animals in her flock. A flock of rare animals, of heritage Shropshire sheep of careful selection and breeding. A disturbing case of years of investigation and persistent intrusion. A case of sorrow and hardship. A case of loss and devastation.
Hear us, almighty human, as the court case for this family farm nears. The Canadian farm is a legacy to Canadian nation building and survival. Heritage breeds remind us of the glorious past of nation building and the strength of the people in pioneering, homesteading, farming and settling the land.
Hear us, almighty human, as we reason this case.

written by Dr. Louise Hayes
November 29, 2013
http://www.empowernetwork.com/?almostassecretid=louisehayes

The Case, page 3

Good morning, almighty human

The adventure of this day, is the adventure of our lives. Brilliant people, from far off places looked at this land with joy. A destiny awaits. A life of more than survival, more than hard work, more than toil and struggle. A life of promise, of achieving potential, of security, of freedom! A colony awaits the brave.
Venture forth, almighty ones. You have chosen the path to a destiny in a land of harsh climate and short growing season. Strength to you, brave ones, for your duty calls and you aspire. Come! Calls the great land and your ears hear the call and your mind sours with imagination and knowledge. Come to this great land and call this colony your home.
And so they came. Brave pioneers, farmers, homesteaders, settlers, bringing with them all of their skills, their training, their knowledge, their strength, their aptitude and their passion. A goal in mind. To settle the vast land and to make it their home.
Praises! Praises for the adventure of your lives and praises still for the enduring negotiation of the nation.
The livestock they brought with them were the wonderful animals whose tough genetics would survive in a land of harsh winters. Heritage breeds of livestock with superior capability of survival in this land.
Strong, independent people, with courage and foresight. Build a nation, was the rallying call. To nationhood they came.
The wild was cleared and the livestock set out to pasture. Excitement and apprehension fills the air. All of the hard work and endless planning must have the expected results. No losses, no agony, no harsh reality. Only the endless call to build, to dream, to prosperity. Only the endless call to colonize, to pursue the dream, to be daring and to venture. We cannot fail.
The livestock are a superior breed. Tough and adaptive, like their human masters. A strong and hearty creature with superior characteristics and genetics. In the sheep, superior wool and meat.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=UfKwQs6DBQ0 = Shropshire sheep

The family farm was fairly small, only enough land that could be cleared and maintained. Enough land to sustain them and then to push them further into prosperity. Well kept land with fertile soil and manageable crops. A lifetime of dreams to pursue. A lifeline to freedom and security. Pastures were cleared and fences erected to keep the great wild at bay.
The livestock adapted, became contented and reproduced healthy offspring. Now prosperity is possible. That being over 170 years ago and still the same strain of animals. The same genetic blood, the heritage breed of yesteryear, still producing their healthy offspring today. These belong to us. They belong to our genetic strains registered here. A breed of rare, heritage sheep. Rare for this country, deserving our attention and protection.
Over a 170 years of careful breeding, four generations of careful family farming. Lifetimes of toil, careful selection. Knowledge, skill, training, education, planning, perseverance, travel, selection, work and work and work. The toil is endless, but the results impressive. Raise the bar! Set the standard high. Achieve the ultimate goal! The lavish praises earned for endless hours of work and perseverance. To you almighty man, for steadfast dedication to your craft. A National Historic site in your name.
Then, a mishap. Eh?
written by Dr. Louise Hayes
November 24, 2013

The Case, page 2

Peace to you almighty human. May you always be wise, with foresight, contemplation, care and giving. May you always look to the legacy of our cultural treasures with affection.
Our national heritage is a varied and diverse treasure. Stately homes, precious gardens, diverse landscapes, natural resources, intelligence, industry and cultural identity. A past of generosity, of peace, sharing and prosperity. It comes from work, from intelligence and from tenacity.
The land was productive, it enticed the farmer. Immigration was encouraged to a colony needing settlers, pioneers, homesteaders and farmers.

William Miller of Pickering Ontario was such a person. Straight from Scotland, he brought with him a desire for farming in 1839 and began a family business of farming including sheep. One of the breeds he brought to Canada was the Shropshire sheep. A sturdy, productive animal with a good woolen coat and good meat. Straight from the British Iles to the farmlands of Canada, four generations of the Miller family raised, traded, imported, sold and bread Shropshire sheep. A Canadian legacy in family farming that has lasted more than 170 years. In that time, the Canadian breeders have developed a strain of animal that has become the Canadian heritage breed of Shropshire sheep.

https://www.rbst.org.uk/sitemanager/uploads/ck_files/files/Shropshire%20-%20Fact%20Sheet(1).pdf

A fine and commendable achievement for a farmer of skills and intelligence. A breeding stock of superior animals to call his own. A family farm of such cultural legacy that it becomes a National Historic site.

http://www.historicplaces.ca/en/rep-reg/place-lieu.aspx?id=9632

More than 170 years of raising a heritage breed. Bloodlines, genetics, registries. record keeping. The meticulous work of selective breeding, preservation and control. Only the best, the finest, the purest strain of the stock. The constant attention, the details. For more than 170 years the perseverance to establish a blood line of genetically superior animals.
The Shropshire sheep is only a sheep, but for Canadian cultural heritage, these are ours. A rare breed of carefully selected genetics, which prove the sustainability of a lifetime of pioneering and generations of careful animal husbandry. Carefully selected animals, carefully selected genetics, perfect coats, perfect specimens, good meat. Sheep that eat grass, not grain, in a Canadian environment of long winters and heavy snowfall. An unusual diet in an animal that eventually lost their popularity to their grain fed counterparts. A small flock of significant cultural heritage. A flock of genetically pure animals of 170 years of Canadian farming history. A rare breed in Canada. A significant achievement in Canadian farming history.
The family farm has been our cultural history for hundreds of years. It has brought settlers and pioneers by the thousands to Canada to call this country home and to build a great colony and a great nation. The strength and fortitude of these skilled experts has carved a farming niche in a country of wild, wooded land.
There are a few significant examples remaining in our country, but 170 years is one of the longest surviving farms in this nation and the strain of livestock that it produced is cultural heritage as well.
Which takes us back to the Shropshire sheep and our case. Page 2
written by Dr. Louise Hayes
November 24, 2013

The Case. page 1

Peace, almighty human. May you be forever the great peace maker, the negotiator, the wise and the brilliant.
The mighty planet sighs and heaves up yet another magnificent tree from such a tiny seed. Nurture and care, almighty ones, the tiny seed contains the life form, the genetic pattern, the strength and endurance to send a huge tree climbing to the sky. A genetic patterning as individual as animal life.
A stand of aspen trees all come from the same source, but each one will be a different colour of green, the leaves turn at different times and the wind blows them to the ground on different days. The trees themselves are part of the life giving force of the planet. The air that we breathe.
We protect our environments and it protects us. The oxygen that the trees produce, saves us.
The wild predator in the great land, saves us. Don’t venture out alone, brave human, it calls to our senses. We don’t and our numbers protect us from the dangers of the wild landscape and the predator has saved us.
The awesome wonder of a special place, protecting a rare flower, we save this. Saved for its unique biological significance. Saved for it’s special contribution to our eyes, its ecosystem, the unique life forms that might depend on it. Saved for it’s beauty, it’s rarity. But saved!
We view the environment as our responsibility to protect, not just for the preservation of the land and it’s inhabitants, but for our survival as well. We protect an ecosystem, with it’s unique biodiversity, because our common sense, our intelligence, our heritage and our education direct us to do so.
The wild, to protect the great wild.
Another animal comes forward and calls to the wind. I am lonely! Another animal on the list of rare, vulnerable or endangered species. Hear us mankind, our numbers decline and the list increases rapidly.
As environmentalists and conservationists we respond with gifts and lobbying for the great wild. It is our home, our legacy and our national treasure.
But treasures come in different forms. As preservationists of cultural integrity, of architecture, of history, the case to save the bio diversity of environments and animal life has always been of imperative urgency. This is what we love. It is beauty to us. It is our dignity and our soul.
Bio diversity is key. It comes in many forms. A multi cultural nation, environmentally diverse regions, the intelligence to work together to save it all.
So now, we come to the case. The family farm.
Historically the homestead and the family farm are the backbone of the country. Early settlers came here with the hopes and dreams of life in a new land and prosperity from the family farm. They brought with them their own breeds of livestock. Hearty animals that could survive the journey, the different land and climate. Heritage breeds of now Canadian animals, that also need our ears. The case is a heritage breed called the Shropshire sheep.

http://shropshiresheep.org/news-on-cfia-slaughter/
written by Dr. Louise Hayes
November 23,2013

Snowball battle

When all that life is, is just to survive, what do you do for PLAY!

Good day to you all you bravehearts

The great Canadian winter is upon us. The great Earth has changed her coat and warms herself beneath a layer of fresh, soft snow. The winter foliage darkens to the deep, dark greens of winter sleep and the air chills to a fresh -C.
Flocks of overwintering birds swirl around the sky and the restful quiet is upon us. A different world awakens us each day. The morning sounds turn to warming engines and the scraping of snow shovels on the sidewalk. Winter brings it’s new delights and winter play is one of our finest hours.
Sport, you awesome human is the name of the day. The abundance of winter activity is the joy of northern living. No shut ins here. The deep freeze of a cold winters day is only a change of clothing, only another layer, a hard fought for Canadian tradition.
Sport presents itself in all of it’s grand variety.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=aRcw8Rurpt0 = snowball fight

As the snow drifts across the path and shovelling piles a mountain beside the walkway, imagination takes hold. A fort, a castle, a moat, a wall. A fortress to defend and the fight is on.
A snowball thrown at a lucky culprit who now has to enter the fight. Accept the challenge of winter fun and join the game! Winter is a fine time of play and sport and snow ball fights occur. A once childish game of play has become organised winter sport, with several regions competing to be the nations snowball champions.

http://www.jasper.travel/snowbattle

It’s just another game to play in a nation of rich winter sporting traditions.

written by Dr. Louise Hayes
November 23, 2013

Barren ground Caribou

Hail brilliant mankind

Cast your eyes upon the wilds of the great land. The wilderness stretches out before you and you are saved. The new land, freshly washed of glacier ice and snow reveals the tundra and the life within. Brave hunters, your lives await you there. Up, way up, above the treeline into the Arctic.
Cast your eyes upon the land and view the newness of the Earth. Your lives await you here, almighty human, the brave explorer, the clever hunter. The wild beasts roam and in your view is the vast herd you’ve been searching for.
Caribou!
Here in the far north is a large migrating herd of caribou. The home of the barren ground caribou as they move across the northern plains of the North West Territories. A way of life for nomadic peoples as they follow the herds for food and clothing. A lifeline, a support, a tradition. Beware, almighty human, the world changes.

http://www.enr.gov.nt.ca/_live/documents/content/2011-2015_Barren-ground_Caribou_Management_Strategy.pdf

The barren ground caribou is in decline. It’s once magnificent numbers in the hundreds of thousands of animals is now declining and the great herds are vanishing. A way of life vanishes with them. Gone is the migrating hunter, who’s dependency upon the caribou sustained them in food and clothing. Gone is the sport hunter and with the loss of the wild herds eco- tourism vanishes as well.
Hail bravehearts to the call of the wild.
The exploitation of the far north is a blight upon us. Overharvesting of a national treasure affects our cultural identity. As an environmentalist and a conservationist, the predation of the wild is a long standing concern. Hardship for the people, hardship for the wildlife and loss of culture, a food source, a tourist delight and a way of life.
The sustainability of the land appears consistent. The food source for the animals themselves seems stable. Overhunting is identified as a factor in the rapid decline and the dwindling numbers of caribou are a threat to the sustainability of the wild.
Eager hunters, your bellies are full and hunting of the magnificent wild is no more.
The lands set aside for wildlife habitat is immense in Canada, but still, the plunder increases. The far north, the tundra, uncultivated, unproductive land, whose resource value is low, but for the wildlife that resides there, it sustains them. Specially adapted animals, whose lives have supported the indigenous peoples of northern Canada for centuries. To loose the herds of the wild is to loose our national, cultural identity. The migration of the early peoples, the fur trade, the choice to inhabit the north. The integrity of the wild is essential to us.
Hail mankind. The world is yours, to protect or discard, choose wisely.
written by Dr. Louise Hayes
November 20,2013

Caribou

Caribou

Good morning Brave hearts

This beautiful new day of discovery is yours.
The open land lays before us and the movement of wildlife stirs in the distance. We take our cameras and creep forward. What is this sight?
Out here in the protected alpine, where few deer and elk will roam, is another animal. Caribou! Taking a stand for wildlife protection gifts us with the sighting of these rare mountain animals. The remnants of a last herd of animals which used to sustain their populations in the remote areas of Jasper National Park.
Here in the mountains is a unique species of woodland caribou that survive only in the highest alpine areas. Lofty alpine meadows, bursting with colourful flowers, high, snow covered peaks, chilly mountain streams and lakes. An area less frequently visited by humans, but home still to the variety of wildlife that entices us here. A chance for a view of the animals remote and rare, brings us out of our world and into the great open spaces of the great wild.
The great wild!
The adventure begins early, the hike is long. Hours of walking along well travelled routes for the opportunity to explore the magnificent wild. The alpine meadows burst with flower, the colours of the earth and the magnificent scenery make us smile. A sighting would be nice.
The elusive woodland caribou who’s numbers are drastically falling in this area, is our photographic joy.

http://www.pc.gc.ca/eng/pn-np/ab/jasper/plan/maligne/ie-ei.aspx

The alpine, in it’s own right, is a place of awesome splendor. The majestic mountain peaks, the array of colour and variety of terrain.
Our constant chatter alerts the ever present bears, who watch from their own safety as passersby invade their home. This is where the grizzly bear lives and hunts and the ever present predator reminds us, never hike alone. The trail is busy, so the chance of a sighting declines as numbers of people improve the chance that the bears will wander off to more peaceful areas. We stay on the trails. No chance encounters, no surprises, no sign of bears today.
No sign of caribou either. The elusive animal is farther back, farther from the trail, farther from human encounters.
This land, as large as it seems to be, is helping to protect some of our nations declining wildlife species. Exactly why the woodland caribou is in decline is not precisely known. The decline seems rapid and with herds as small as these, their own recovery is in peril.
Save us mankind! Calls the great wild and caribou recovery projects persist. The tracts of land set aside for wildlife conservation are being invaded, almighty human and the disturbance upsets shy, sensitive species. In reality, they are all sensitive species, needing care and protection.
The great wild and it’s wild inhabitants are a gift. Come almighty human, to save our national treasures. This UNESCO heritage site is one of those gifts.

http://shop.wwf.ca/?utm_source=adwords&utm_medium=cpc&utm_campaign=Adoptions2013&utm_term=search&gclid=CPy6pMa77LoCFcdAMgod1z4A_g

written by Dr. Louise Hayes
November 17,2013