Ancestory

Good morning Brave hearts!

Rise and shine! The world awaits you on this glorious day of fun filled adventure and grand survival. Hail to you, almighty human, for the far reaches of your destiny and for the clever intellect that saves you there.
Here, in the far north, resides the inventor. Clever human of specialized skills who lives in remote, but inspiring circumstances in the awesome and wondrous far north.
The inventor, who’s skills have saved them from the cold, from starvation and from isolation.
Scrape off your vehicles, run the engine, pull out the snow blower, shovel, shovel, shovel. The life in winter has it’s moments of back breaking hard work, icy sidewalks and treacherous driving. Pull out the sand, the salt, the ice melters. Let the plows pass to clean the streets. The snowy, blowy, frosty winter is upon us.
Hail bravehearts, to the brilliant lives of our forerunners. To building igloos, to building kayaks, to catching fish and to harnessing dogs. The life of the land was a hard one and the brilliant inventor survived by necessity, cunning and ingenuity.
The howling dogs greet their masters in the snowy morning. Dogs for hunting with and for pulling sleighs. Dogs that make their lives easier by transportation and pulling cargo. Dogs, harnessed to sleighs for sport, hunting, travelling and carrying. The dogs are a savior to the aboriginals of the far north. They carry far more than anyone could ever carry on a pack and travel more quickly and more efficiently. Dogs and man, an age old friendship, for dogs willingly accept habitation amongst humans and comply with training.
The dog sled was invented in approximately 800 BC by the Thule peoples of the Canadian high Arctic. Ancestors of the Inuit, the Thule people carved a niche in the far north, migrating hundreds of miles to their destination across the Canadian arctic. They traveled all the way across the continent of North America from Alaska, to new worlds on the other side, as far as Labrador. In the cold, snowy north, where game is plentiful, snowfall high and temperatures plunging to cold minus’s, these adaptive peoples resided.
The allure of the land held them captive and they lived on the abundant, prosperity of the gifts of the earth.
Clever aptitudes, building whale bone housing, covered with animal skins, or sod houses, or igloos. The inventor kept the cold at bay with warm housing made from the materials at hand.
Hail to you, oh brave hearts of the far north, for inventions that saved you, for perseverance and cleverness,for your great adaptability to a harsh and unforgiving climate in a land of awesome wonder and beauty. The ancient peoples of our nation resided in some of the harshest and most extreme climates in the world. Not mearly to survive, but to live and to thrive in dangerous and remote places.

http://www.glenbow.org/thule/?lang=en&p=outside&t=enhanced&s=3-1&mi=1

written by Dr. Louise Hayes
January 31,2014

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The Kayak

Good Day, Brave hearts!

Rise to the early morning need of daily sustenance. Your food awaits you in the refrigerator, the freezer, the cupboard, the pantry, the kitchen, the grocery store and the meal is cooked on the stove, in the microwave, the kettle, the oven, the coffee maker. Your adrenaline soars and your spirits rise as the smell of your morning brew awakes you, from Guatemala, from China, from Venezuela, from India, from Columbia, from Thailand and the brands are from other sources all world wide as our morning starts with international brews from all over the world. International trade has given us a boost to start the day and out of the house we go.
But wait, what did you say? The morning starts with the catch of the day? You rise at day break, but there is no dawn and you set out on ice flows to catch a fish, or a walrus, or a seal? You rise at whatever time your biological clock rouses you and you put on your mukluks and warm winter clothing and venture out to catch your mornings feast. The blast of cold air awakens instantly and the hunt is on.
The voices of fellow hunters call and the companionship that binds and protects creates the security of the small band.
Here in the far north the hunters pick up harpoons and kayak and prepare to enter the Arctic ocean, for the catch is just off shore.
4000 years of Arctic dwelling has left these experts to a life of fortitude. The craft, a kayak, is an invention of theirs, 4000 years of ocean hunting and 4000 years of kayak building.
The craft is made of wood, or driftwood, or bone with seal skin stretched over the shell. The paddle is made of wood or bone and the clothing of sealskin to repel water. The skin spray skirt keeps the water out and keeps the boat dry in case of capsizing. The famous and necessary Eskimo roll was first performed by these Inuit hunters.
The Inuit are the inventors of the kayak and have been using these specifically made boats for thousands of years. Each man has a boat of his own, made to fit him perfectly.
In an area so remote as Greenland, Baffin Island and the northern Arctic coastline of Canada, where these people choose to dwell.
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Kayak

Now, with harpoon and kayak, the great hunter can catch walrus, fish, seal and whale. The necessities of life.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=MTGGHBq5je8 A History of the Kayak and the Eskimo

Although this film is about Alaska, it gives a good depiction of the life of the Inuit, which would be typical of Canadian history as well.

Written by Dr. Louise Hayes
January 24, 2014