The St Lawrence River

The St Lawrence River

English: Map of Jacques Cartier's second voyag...

English: Map of Jacques Cartier’s second voyage to North America in 1535-6. (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

Good Day!  You Awesome Human.

As we explore our great country through Rivers to Oceans week, we celebrate the daring, the courage, the monumental feats of bravery.  The country was explored and opened by brave hearts.

The exploration by Jacques Cartier in 1534 to 1542 was the first European exploration of the St. Lawrence River.

The oceans brought the European to the already well inhabited land.  The country had been populated for thousands of years already, by migrants who crossed the northern land mass and settled in  the continent.

The Europeans crossed the oceans in a daring adventure of exploration, to discover what lies beyond the horizon and to unite worlds separated by water, tides, waves, weather, distance and fortitude.

Only your dreams will push you on, only your nightmares will stop you!

The bold adventurers came, onward, onward, into the straits of the St. Lawrence and pushed their crafts farther into the heart of the nation.  The contact was made, the discovery excels.  A new people, a new world, new trade, new prosperity.   The St. Lawrence River was the channel of discovery for these fortunate mariners.  It brought them fame, fortune, trade and the exhilarating right of conquest.  It secured their mission, proved their aptitude, yes, almighty human, the doors to the nation opened and the country let them in.

The mighty St. Lawrence River was the pathway to prosperity, negotiation, settlement and pride.  Oh, you worthy stalwart, to set sail on that day, one day, for the quest of your lives, for the rest of your lives.  To be the history, the making of a great nation.  To be the almighty man.

That one awesome, inspired day, became the might and greatness of several great nations.  Jacques Cartier for France visited a country named for a collection of huts.  Kanata!  And so it was born.  Born from the passage of a great river, born from the passage of a great ocean.  Born from brilliant aptitudes of navigation, sailing, shipbuilding, negotiation, leadership, compassion and daring.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Jacques_cartier

The bold adventurer seeks the challenge and the brilliant aptitudes achieves it.

The consequential negotiation brought fantastic prosperity to France.  The oceans yielded a seemingly unlimited harvest of fresh fish for the hungry. Food in abundance, led early settlers to a new land, a new life of promise.  The negotiation was successful, colonization was possible.  The impossible dream would be attempted.

For France the colony meant new lands, new life, new wealth.  The daring challenge was met, the conquest told.  Oh you fortuitous stalwarts, climb aboard.  Climb aboard for the adventure of you life.  There’s no looking back.  And so they did.   Pioneers who could settle an unknown nation, with unknown plants and soil.  To cut a tract of land for farming, build houses, invent.   To set the course of history.  To be the indomitable human.

http://suite101.com/article/jacques-cartier-and-charlesbourgroyal-a173492

The first colony was on the banks of the mighty St. Lawrence River.  It didn’t last, but the failure didn’t stop  them.  Another attempt would be made.

Rivers to Oceans.  This week is for us. This is our cultural heritage.  From rivers and oceans our nation was born.

Hail, almighty human.

written by Dr. Louise Hayes

June 12, 2013

www.bbcanada.com/10895.html

http://www.empowernetwork.com/?id=louisehayes

Rivers to Oceans Week

Rivers to Oceans Week

Congratulations you awesome being.  This is National Rivers to Oceans Week and this is our cultural heritage.

The immense cover of ice and snow that we call the Columbia Ice fields is the birthplace of some of our great rivers.  The vast sheet of ice at the border between Jasper and Banff National Parks is an awesome place of remote grandeur.  The spectacular, stark beauty of the masses of snow and mountain are a land unto themselves.  A land of life in high altitude and cold.  The streams from the melted ice are flowing with todays  first water and cascading into rivers and waterfalls, avalanches and crevases.  The ice fields are where some of our mighty historical rivers are born.  The daily melt water is the first drop of water into a river system that flows throughout most of the country

The huge icefields cover 215 square kilometers and is 300 to 360 metres deep in some places.  This massive sheet of ice provides us with clean, fresh, new water.

http://www.explorerockies.com/columbia-icefield/

Water! Our national heritage was formed from these rivers.  Great explorers ventured into our nation by these same rivers and lakes.

The historic Athabasca River, a fur trading route, is one of our national heritage rivers which starts at the Columbia Ice fields.  The importance of the Athabasca river, with its designation as a Canadian Heritage River  is its connection to exploration and the settling of the country.  The rivers in Canada played a major role in establishing the country.  Fur traders embarked on lengthy journeys of adventure and trade to explore, meet and negotiate trade with the indigenous peoples.

The fur trade was the most important industry in the country in the early years of settlement.

http://www.chrs.ca/en/main.php

The Columbia Ice Fields are also the source of the North Saskatchewan River and the headwaters of the tributary of the Columbia River.  This is the top of the Continental divide, where waters flow to the Pacific, the Artic and to Hudson Bay.  The significance of this, is waterways all across the country.  For exploration, the waterways provided access all throughout the nation.

The mighty St Lawrence River was the first river accessed by explorers from Europe.  Jacques Cartier explored this area for France in the late 1400’s and made connections with the local people who resided near the shores.  The St. Lawrence is an access route into the interior of the country.  By exploring this route, Europeans were able to penetrate far into the nation and in doing so, discover the wealth and abundance of the land.   The sea wealth for fishing and the forest for furs.

The river and lakes system is so vast it connects one province to another through historical waterways that were travelled frequently by early explorers.

Water!  A wealth for our land. A country filled with lakes and rivers.  The play land for sports.  The abundance in fishing.  The salvation of our populace.  Our good fortune is to have water.  Clean water.  Unpolluted water.  Water filled with life.  Aquatic life, plant life, animal life and ultimately, our life.

written by Dr. Louise Hayes

June 11, 2013

www.bbcanada.com/10895.html

http://www.empowernetwork.com/?id=louisehayes