Quiet

Quiet

Good Day, oh brilliant ones.

Welcome!

Welcome to this world in a far off place. A land of forest wealth and wild orchard plenty. A land where the nomad would be secure among the currants and the berries.
The land stretched out its hand and offered food to the adventurer who would dare to traverse the oceans to find it. No more starvation in this land of plenty. Food, to nourish you and food to sustain you. Come to this land and fill your vessels. Fish from the sea, to fill your platters. Dine from the sea, oh great adventurer. Fill your vessels and make your fortune. A harvest of wealth and nourishment from the sea.
The Europeans fished the shores of the Grand Banks of Newfoundland, enjoying the easy catch from casting nets into the seas. Fish, by the thousands, swam in the ocean depths and the bounty of the sea was plentiful and the catch was successful. Harvest the seas, oh brave ones and fill your bellies from the Earth.
Although the Grand Banks are a long way from Europe, over fishing in the waters off the European shore, had depleted the fish stocks there. The next best available, was the long ocean voyage, across the Atlantic to the great fishing hole of the Atlantic, the Grand Banks. A journey of 4565 kilometers across the tumultuous seas to cast their nets into the abundant ocean and return with the victorious catch.
A way of life, the fisherman. Coming from several European countries, the fishermen were English, French, Spanish and Portuguese. Filling vessels by the load, of delectable treats. Over fishing the oceans was not a new issue.
The problems continue. Too many people, not enough food. Even the mighty oceans can’t sustain us.
In the sixteen hundreds, the world was new. Canada and it’s great land of plenty, was opening it’s doors to the impoverished world. “Come, calls the great land, I will feed you!” Come, harvest my platter, you poor, starving souls. There is plenty here.
Four hundred years later, it’s gone.
The great fishing vessels, cast their nets, no more. A crisis in survival, as the oceans are exhausted. Those breeding specimens, caught and eaten, spawn no more. Critically endangered, their numbers plummet. Striving to survive and to live themselves, the stores of the great oceans are closing.
The ecosystem is in peril. Without the variety in the food chain, other species are plundered and perish. The larger, more desirable fish are vanishing and the smaller ones can’t keep up. We’re eating the babies and we’re eating the mature, mating adults.
Eating and eating, plunder and loss, the oceans quiet and the stillness resounds in our ears. The lonely tide rolls in, with no calling birds to greet it, and leaves behind a sterile beach, without shells and seaweed. The tiny shells, a food source for some birds, are vanishing.
Extinction.
But still the tide rolls in and still the oceans call us. Come, mankind, I will feed you no more, but come into the oceans and play.

written by Dr. Louise Hayes
March 4, 2015

The St Lawrence River

The St Lawrence River

English: Map of Jacques Cartier's second voyag...

English: Map of Jacques Cartier’s second voyage to North America in 1535-6. (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

Good Day!  You Awesome Human.

As we explore our great country through Rivers to Oceans week, we celebrate the daring, the courage, the monumental feats of bravery.  The country was explored and opened by brave hearts.

The exploration by Jacques Cartier in 1534 to 1542 was the first European exploration of the St. Lawrence River.

The oceans brought the European to the already well inhabited land.  The country had been populated for thousands of years already, by migrants who crossed the northern land mass and settled in  the continent.

The Europeans crossed the oceans in a daring adventure of exploration, to discover what lies beyond the horizon and to unite worlds separated by water, tides, waves, weather, distance and fortitude.

Only your dreams will push you on, only your nightmares will stop you!

The bold adventurers came, onward, onward, into the straits of the St. Lawrence and pushed their crafts farther into the heart of the nation.  The contact was made, the discovery excels.  A new people, a new world, new trade, new prosperity.   The St. Lawrence River was the channel of discovery for these fortunate mariners.  It brought them fame, fortune, trade and the exhilarating right of conquest.  It secured their mission, proved their aptitude, yes, almighty human, the doors to the nation opened and the country let them in.

The mighty St. Lawrence River was the pathway to prosperity, negotiation, settlement and pride.  Oh, you worthy stalwart, to set sail on that day, one day, for the quest of your lives, for the rest of your lives.  To be the history, the making of a great nation.  To be the almighty man.

That one awesome, inspired day, became the might and greatness of several great nations.  Jacques Cartier for France visited a country named for a collection of huts.  Kanata!  And so it was born.  Born from the passage of a great river, born from the passage of a great ocean.  Born from brilliant aptitudes of navigation, sailing, shipbuilding, negotiation, leadership, compassion and daring.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Jacques_cartier

The bold adventurer seeks the challenge and the brilliant aptitudes achieves it.

The consequential negotiation brought fantastic prosperity to France.  The oceans yielded a seemingly unlimited harvest of fresh fish for the hungry. Food in abundance, led early settlers to a new land, a new life of promise.  The negotiation was successful, colonization was possible.  The impossible dream would be attempted.

For France the colony meant new lands, new life, new wealth.  The daring challenge was met, the conquest told.  Oh you fortuitous stalwarts, climb aboard.  Climb aboard for the adventure of you life.  There’s no looking back.  And so they did.   Pioneers who could settle an unknown nation, with unknown plants and soil.  To cut a tract of land for farming, build houses, invent.   To set the course of history.  To be the indomitable human.

http://suite101.com/article/jacques-cartier-and-charlesbourgroyal-a173492

The first colony was on the banks of the mighty St. Lawrence River.  It didn’t last, but the failure didn’t stop  them.  Another attempt would be made.

Rivers to Oceans.  This week is for us. This is our cultural heritage.  From rivers and oceans our nation was born.

Hail, almighty human.

written by Dr. Louise Hayes

June 12, 2013

www.bbcanada.com/10895.html

http://www.empowernetwork.com/?id=louisehayes

National Oceans Day

National Oceans Day

http://www.commerce.gov/blog/2013/06/07/june-8-marks-world-ocean-day-noaa%E2%80%99s-national-ocean-service-concludes-30-days-oceans

Welcome, almighty human, to this day of salvation, memory and adventure.  Who are we, but the builder of ships, the sailor of the mighty seas, the adventurer of the ocean. To set sail, has been the adventure of our lives for thousands of years.  To set forth, to discover, to fish, to explore, to enjoy.  The oceans have always been a place for us and have always provided for us.

The vast seas with their immense variety of life forms, so many that we are still discovering them to this day.  The oceans, to their dark depths and to their far off horizon.  They compel mankind to discover.  They entice us.  What lies beneath the surface of these great waters.  Through our thousands of years of human history, the answer has always been, food!  Food for the hungry.  The oceans are plundered world wide for food.

The oceans give us plenty.  The fisherman casts his nets to save the starving world populace.  Food.

The ocean also gives us a play land of fun.  Large waves to surf in, warm beaches to lay upon, soft sand with interesting shells, warm water and curious creatures to watch.  The oceans, with their tides, the sunset, their beauty are another call to adventure for us.  Even if we are small, we still love the ocean.

There is another call to action, that the ocean brings to us.  The waste, the garbage, the  toxins, the pollution.

http://www.good.is/posts/end-plastic-pollution-pick-it-up-bin-it-take-three-for-the-sea

The garbage that ends up in the ocean, kills sealife world.  The oceans are becoming a dump of waste.  Plastics, which are recyclable and other waste are building up in the oceans and destroying water, the plant life, the reefs, the coral, the animal, the fish and the bird life.  The pristine beauty of the world, that we covet so much is vanishing to a view of discarded waste.   Plastic, paper, cans, bottles all being tossed into the water causes pollution that even this almighty planet Earth cannot control.

The awesome planet, with so much healing and creative power, can’t keep  up with the plunder, the reckless destruction, the habitat loss, the pollution, the oil spills.

Hail mankind!  As mighty as we are, we still turn to the planet to save us.  To save us from starvation, from cold, from poverty, even from despair.  We expect the awesome planet to regenerate itself, to heal and to cure itself, to replenish what we take and to repair the damage.  We assume that the awesome planet can recover and give it all back.

Not so.

The mighty planet needs help.  The mighty oceans can’t keep up with the fishing industry.  They can’t keep up with the discarded waste, they can’t keep up with the environmental damage.  They can’t keep up with the plunder.

Today is only one day.  World Oceans Day.  One day for environmental day, but this day, this one day, must last for the rest of our lives.  To  change the world takes one day and one day to last for all time.  The oceans and all of its creatures are needed for the survival of this planet.

http://www.water-pollution.org.uk/

Rejoice!  Today is the day for the Oceans.  Rejoice.  It is an awesome day.

Written by Dr. Louise Hayes

June 8, 2013