Igloo

Good Morning Brave hearts

Wake up to a day of architectural delights. Fascinating domains from our cold climate. The perfect dome shape of carved snow, of barking dogs and aurora borealis brilliance, to start the morning off right. Add endless darkness, sub zero temperatures, a little wind chill and here’s the start of a great day in the far north.
Brave human, a day of reckoning with severe climate, possibly predators and elusive game makes today a day of challenge for the Arctic champions of survival. During the darkest months of the year, when the cold is the deepest and the snow is the highest, those tiny domes in the snow, protected small villages of independent and high spirited individuals, who saw the great north as a frontier, called home.

http://www.eskimold.com/uploads/3/1/4/1/3141575/2_a_history_of_igloos.pdf

Way back in far off history, tells a time of human migration throughout Asia to Canada. People were mobile and robust, following herds of game animals, in search of food. Following the call of the wild, to the daunting task of immigration and settlement, of the new frontier, of the far north.
These ingenious people with inventive minds, created the dwelling of snow for shelter and habitation. The landed migrants of Asia, set up domiciles of snow, igloos, to house themselves, during the long winter’s cold. A snow house of warmth and comfort, easy to build, with readily available building materials.
High up in the Arctic tundra, above the treeline, where wood is sparse or non-existent, remains the ancestors of those ancient pioneers. Settlers to the far north with courage and creativity, the daring human, with perseverance and skills, tackled a task of bold survival in extremely harsh conditions and carved a niche of humanity, in a land of constant challenge.
Out on the barren landscape, stands a village of domes. An Inuit village of igloos, carved from compacted snow and filled with an Inuit family and their precious belongings. Furs to sleep on, whale oil for light and cooking, utensils and tools. The daily awakening to a wind swept view of barren, snow covered land. To temperatures dropping to more than -40 and to the more chilling need for food.
Feed the hungry, great hunters. The caribou roam in herds and the walrus plays in the ocean. Yours is a land of extremes. A call to the will of the indomitable human.
Bravo to you, almighty human and to the will of survival. To your place in our history and to your perfect domes, the igloo, on our list of the seven wonders of Canada.
written by Dr, Louise Hayes
January 10, 2014

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Barren ground Caribou

Hail brilliant mankind

Cast your eyes upon the wilds of the great land. The wilderness stretches out before you and you are saved. The new land, freshly washed of glacier ice and snow reveals the tundra and the life within. Brave hunters, your lives await you there. Up, way up, above the treeline into the Arctic.
Cast your eyes upon the land and view the newness of the Earth. Your lives await you here, almighty human, the brave explorer, the clever hunter. The wild beasts roam and in your view is the vast herd you’ve been searching for.
Caribou!
Here in the far north is a large migrating herd of caribou. The home of the barren ground caribou as they move across the northern plains of the North West Territories. A way of life for nomadic peoples as they follow the herds for food and clothing. A lifeline, a support, a tradition. Beware, almighty human, the world changes.

http://www.enr.gov.nt.ca/_live/documents/content/2011-2015_Barren-ground_Caribou_Management_Strategy.pdf

The barren ground caribou is in decline. It’s once magnificent numbers in the hundreds of thousands of animals is now declining and the great herds are vanishing. A way of life vanishes with them. Gone is the migrating hunter, who’s dependency upon the caribou sustained them in food and clothing. Gone is the sport hunter and with the loss of the wild herds eco- tourism vanishes as well.
Hail bravehearts to the call of the wild.
The exploitation of the far north is a blight upon us. Overharvesting of a national treasure affects our cultural identity. As an environmentalist and a conservationist, the predation of the wild is a long standing concern. Hardship for the people, hardship for the wildlife and loss of culture, a food source, a tourist delight and a way of life.
The sustainability of the land appears consistent. The food source for the animals themselves seems stable. Overhunting is identified as a factor in the rapid decline and the dwindling numbers of caribou are a threat to the sustainability of the wild.
Eager hunters, your bellies are full and hunting of the magnificent wild is no more.
The lands set aside for wildlife habitat is immense in Canada, but still, the plunder increases. The far north, the tundra, uncultivated, unproductive land, whose resource value is low, but for the wildlife that resides there, it sustains them. Specially adapted animals, whose lives have supported the indigenous peoples of northern Canada for centuries. To loose the herds of the wild is to loose our national, cultural identity. The migration of the early peoples, the fur trade, the choice to inhabit the north. The integrity of the wild is essential to us.
Hail mankind. The world is yours, to protect or discard, choose wisely.
written by Dr. Louise Hayes
November 20,2013

The Yukon

The Yukon

Good day you awesome human

As the glaciers receded and the snow melted, the animal life moved southward into the continent. With the travel of the wildlife, the human followed. A new world was being carved from the snow caps. New life to discover, new trails to follow, a new path to a new world.
Come almighty human, into the heart of the continent.
The dutiful call to adventure thrust early man deep into the heart of the far north.
Those who loved the fabulous north live there still. In the remote Arctic Circle with its earthly gifts and awesome star struck wonder. Those who ventured forward encountered more snowfall in this chilly climate. But the usual scene of forest, lakes, rivers, wildlife and vegetation kept them alive.
An adventure!
An adventure for early man and an adventure still you awesome human. Into the land of the midnight sun, of perpetual darkness, of northern lights. A land of remote distance and close fellowship, of hardship and earthly delights, of sporting enthusiasts and cultural integrity. Of domiciles of snow and the endless land to stretch and play in.
Here in the vast forests, the lakes, rivers and snow, live and play the early settlers of this nation and their welcomed guests.
Bold bravehearts, the world calls to you. Come almighty human to the heart of the country. Come to the beginning!

http://travelyukon.com/

To climb the highest mountains, to view the colourful meadows, the rich blues of lakes and the dazzling 24 hours of sunlight. Here is the home of thousands of years of human history, of the birth of culture that is Canadian. The evolution of man brings with it dance, song, artwork, cuisine and joy. A human of energy and skill. The talents needed for survival.
We assume the climate is harsh, perhaps unjustifiably. Life is as life is made. Joy to you, mighty brave hearts. To push the limits of life worth living to the darkest corner of our nation.
The Yukon territory has set aside a vast amount of land to National and Provincial parkland, wildlife reserve, heritage rivers and First Nations land settlements. It boasts thousands of kilometers of pristine wilderness for the sports and nature enthusiast to enjoy.

http://www.env.gov.yk.ca/camping-parks/federal-protected-areas.php

With such a small population and so much country to enjoy, the remote far north is a breathtaking wilderness of forest and mountain.
As their counterparts travelled the unknown trail to track the wild animals and spread themselves across the continent, the aboriginals of the Yukon stayed.
Stay for the awesome splendor of the great land, the wild life to be viewed, the sports to be enjoyed. Still to be seen from the eyes of the adventurer as mainly untouched, undeveloped and unspoilt. The great land, the far north.
written by Dr. Louise Hayes
November 14,2013

Dog sledding

Dog sledding

Good day, you awesome human

Today it has snowed. The chilly wonder of a winter’s delight. Our nations most favourite past times are here.
The dogs whine and climb out of their white, snowy blankets. A new day of mushing and racing is upon them. Friendly, eager playmates in a life of Canadian made fun.
The sun pierces the sky and casts it’s golden warmth upon us. A fabulous, chilly -35C. A perfect day. A day of winter delight, of breakneck speed through the wild land, of wind on your face and warmth in the air. A day of endurance, strength, preparedness, fun! The great planet calls to us from the landscape and we’re off. Off to an adventure, off to another day of grand pursuits.
The eons of time travels quickly with us. Generations of dog sledding flies past our feet. We must. In our minds we know that we must. Carrying on the history of nation building, the travels of voyageurs, the present day sportsman and adventurer, the tourist. In a land of long winters and brilliant dark sky the endless preoccupation with the joys of winter fun is a must.

As Canadians, these traditions fill us with joy and wonder. The long race of dog sledding, a time of daring adventure, a feat of a thrilling pursuit. An age of discovery, when dog sledding helped to open the country and helped to transport goods, food and people across the land. A method of transportation for early explorers. Across the great white, snow covered plains of the Arctic. Dog sledding carrying us, as Canadians, all across the land.
Mile upon mile the dogs will run, day after day. The race. Such a thrilling adventure for dog and man.
The dogs stretch their limbs and howl. Run! they cry and off we go.
The winter!
The transportation corridors change and sometimes are easier with ice and snow. A frozen lake is a short cut, the marshes and bogs are easily crossed. Better to travel in winter with ice and snow and the howl of dogs in your ears. Faster and less dangerous than running rapids with canoes and the winter forest shines with snow.
Culture!
What we do to save ourselves, to explore, to open trade routes, to fulfill our negotiated contracts.
The dog team is an integral part of our culture. It’s a need fulfilled. Across the great land to explore, to reach communities with goods for trade. To fulfill business contracts and to live.
Here, almighty human in the great white north is the destiny of a lifetime of adventure. It called to the early explorer. Come to Canada! Live the adventure! And so they did.
Criss crossing the nation from trading post to trading post with sleighs laden with supplies. A life of business enterprise. Dog and man, racing across the great plains of the provinces, dog and man, racing east to west and back again. Dog and man racing to the north, racing to the south.
Culture and tradition whistling in our ears.
The dogs, our coveted friends.
Praises to you brilliant mankind, for the peace of trade and for the joy adventure. The negotiated peace that saves our lives.
written by Dr. Louise Hayes
November 12,2013

Above the Arctic Circle

Praises mankind
To your thousands of years of history in the making. To the vast land of the high Arctic, where a small group of people came to inhabit this great land. Approximately 50,000 square miles of remote Arctic wilderness, where the shallow lakes of yesteryear remain an ecological and human delight of today. The proven history of pre history mankind.
Dance, you dazzling northern lights. Fill the skies with the beauty of the night. Dance and play with your dazzling colours, your mesmerizing movements of light and your own sound.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=BCqX_aIHQ0I Northern lights and tranquility music.

The vast night sky, with its thousands of twinkling stars, stretches the imagination. What lies beyond this great planet Earth? Into the vastness of the galaxy, our minds roam for answers. Are we alone?
Pre history man, with his small colony in the far north was alone. A group of people who found that perfect place. A land of richness and abundance, of beauty and tranquility. The peace of the great land welcomed them, saved them and they dwelled in relative prosperity.
Hear us, sighs the great planet, as another contract is signed for environmental protection. An oasis, almighty human. Since the dawn of time, this land has been intact, full of the precious life forms and the majestic land of ancient Earth.
The evolutionary path is a trail of archeological treasure. It tells a story of early Canada, of a migration of aboriginal peoples who followed their prey as it moved across the globe. Animals of the great plains of Africa, hyenas, camels and sloth, plus wooley mammoth, tigers, giant beavers and reindeer.
In their own migratory path, the people have come from Africa. So did the wildlife, to the great plains of the far north.
The Earth, the ever changing planet.
Stay, almighty human, in the land of the far north. The animals die out as the planet changes and cools. Other animals arrived to take their place. As the glaciers recede and the rest of Canada warms, the high Arctic cools.
But the land is a massive oasis of life and living, of sport and hunting of play and daring. The adventure of your lives!
For the early human had an aptitude for survival. He was the fittest, he was the strongest and he was the bravest.

http://www.eco.gov.yk.ca/pdf/FN_Com_Profile_VGFN_LH_ed.pdf

Come, you bravehearts, come to the land of prehistory mankind. Come into the land of the mighty Yukon territory and explore with us the great secrets of our ancestry.
Hail, you almighty human, for the adventure of your lives.
written by Dr. Louise Hayes
November 8, 2013

Old Crow Flats

Old Crow Flats

Good morning Bravehearts!

A brilliant new day, for brilliant new minds.
Clever bravehearts, the adventure continues, deep into the depths of prehistory man. Deep into the brilliant life of life above the tundra, life in the great Arctic, above the Arctic circle.
A vast and exquisite land of migrating wildlife and of the peoples who have inhabited this place for thousands of years.
The unspoilt far north. A rugged and dangerous land filled with snowcaps and frigid waters, rough tundra and alpine flora. The mighty animal life of the far north, polar bear, caribou, walrus, whale and the people who still live in this remote and harsh part of the world.
Our sense of reality assumes the worst. Freezing cold, barren landscape, months of endless darkness, but thousands of years ago, the earth was a much different place. Here, up above the Arctic Circle was a land of warmer climate. As the rest of Canada lay covered under a sheet of glacial ice and snow, the high Arctic was home to many species of wildlife. Way up in the high Arctic, a vast preservation of lakes, ponds, marshes and land is now occupied by throngs of migrating birds, to the point that it is protected as a bird refuge. Here is the home of prehistory man as he enters the continent of North America and settles in Canada. A protected land that is now a vast land settlement area which includes government land, Vuntut National Park and the ancestral lands of the Vuntut Gwitchen people.

http://www.tc.gov.yk.ca/publications/ice_age_old_crow.pdf

How long ago, for the great human, the almighty man, who conquers all. The carbon dating of the tools indicates thousands of years ago. The migration of people into continental America is earlier than what was once believed. An area called Old Crow flats and the fossil finds in the Blue Fish caves tell a story of this ancient world.

http://www.taiga.net/wetlands/oldcrow/oc_gen.html

The pre history shows a collection of unusual animals. Fossils galore, but not of this world, not of this continent. Hyenas. A scavenger who follows predators and injured animals, waiting for cast offs, or an easy kill. Camels, sloth. A far different world, in the far north. A land of lush vegetation, abundance of wildlife, safe habitation for dwellings, an easier life than now.

http://www.civilization.ca/research-and-collections/research/resources-for-scholars/essays-1/archaeology-1/jacques-cinq-mars/significance-of-the-bluefish-caves-in-beringian-prehistory3/

The brilliant bravehearts of that world inhabited a beautiful landscape of plenty. The people stayed.
The Old Crow flats and Blue Fish Caves are areas of significant archeological treasure and environmental protection. This protected area boasts some of the worlds most significant archeological findings. Discoveries that prove pre history man was a man of skills and that the planet is an ever changing world. The migration of man, at the dawn of our nations history is revealed in the unparalleled beauty of the majestic far north. In a collection of lakes, high in the mountains, where the summer days are continual daylight and the temperature is a warm 15C.
High above the Arctic Circle where no one dreams to believe, that here is the dawning of Canada. Here is the brave new world of ancient man.
Daring human, we hear your words. Come to the far north. Come to the adventure of your lives.
written by Dr. Louise Hayes
November 5,2013

The Dawn of Time

Good morning Bravehearts.
In the beginning, the world was lush with vegetation and wildlife. In the beginning, the far north was the place to be. In the beginning, above the Arctic Circle, was a paradise of habitat for plant and animal and human. In the beginning, before the last glaciers receded, while Canada was under a layer of ice and snow, the far north was home to many residents. It still is.
Come to the beginning, to Vuntut National Park, Yukon Territory, to the dawn of mankind in the Canada.

http://www.pc.gc.ca/pn-np/yt/vuntut/index.aspx

Here, in this vast and remote wilderness lies the key to prehistory mankind. An unusual ecosystem, high up in the Arctic, with relatively warm climate, berries, birds, animals, fish. Food in abundance and weather temperate enough for survival. Low annual snowfall lightly covers the winter ground, sub zero temperatures to -35C. An oasis of lakes, marsh, pond, vegetation. This large protected area is where the story begins. Here in the mighty north.
Praises mankind, to your thousands of years of human habitation in the far north. Your story will be told.

http://www.taiga.net/wetlands/oldcrow/oc_gen.html

The peoples are the Vuntut Gwitchen, the settlers and survivors of a world of constant change. They came to a land of plenty and stayed for the life that the land provides. A life of hunting and gathering, trapping, boating. A life of relative ease with food in abundance. Sports, fishing. The endless beauty of the Earth, the endless beauty of the sky.
With so much provided there’s time to think and time to play, time to imagine and time to work. Time to investigate and explore. Time to build a nation, a culture, a language, dwellings a home. With glaciers receding there’s an opportunity to travel south, but they stayed. Stay in your own vast oasis of relative warmth and adventure. Of food and prosperity.
The great Earth provided an immense land of abundance and opportunity. The land of and the lands surrounding Vuntut National Park.
written by Dr. Louise Hayes
November 3, 2013

To a new land

To a new land

Hail Brave hearts!

Brilliant mankind, the oasis of a new world calls to you. Venture for, almighty human. Cross the land bridge to the new world.
The age of discovery is always upon us. A new world, just to explore. The ability to survive in worlds unknown is the aptitude of the adventurer.
Brave hearts, calls the great planet, venture forth and thousands of years ago, they did. Into the wild unknown of a land of Alaska, a small group of people lived for thousands of years before the glaciers melted enough for them to move onward.
Human habitation of the far north of continental North America occurred thousands of years prior to the discovery of land beneath the ice and snow of the last great glacial period. Canada was virtually covered in ice and human habitation was impossible.
The far north, where it all began.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/First_Nations

As the icecaps melted and receded, the path to lands further south opened to their eyes. Follow, calls the great planet, come to explore and almighty man, the human, travels further into the continent. Further into the unknown, further away from the ancestral lands of their heritage. Following the paths of wild animals, hunting and building and discovering the new world.
The human of post glacial times is the mankind of our world today. Whatever drives mankind to explore, to venture forth, to enhance their skills, to found new nations, is the same mankind that travelled by foot, or perhaps by boat, down coastal North America, to conquer a brave new world.
Travel and exploration, for curiosity, for their governments, for plunder. The continent of the Americas 20000 years ago was as remote to humans as the ocean depths.
Still, the exploration is necessary. Bravehearts, you must go. You must colonize the new world. Take with you all of your skills, your fine aptitudes, your belongings, your philosophies, your peoples. Follow the path to your dreams!
Along the way, these brave new settlers encountered a different land. Their perspectives changed, they developed new theories, new culture, new philosophy. The land was immense. There was plenty. Plenty to adapt to, plenty to think about, plenty to inspire and to challenge their resourcefulness. Brilliant mankind of ancient past, you are always with us. You are with us in this new world, in your discovery, in your skills and fine minds.
The adventurer of the past left it all behind, for whatever reason, known only to them, to push forth as the ancient Vikings did, as the Europeans did, as the Pilgrims did.
The human, you awesome mankind, open doors for yourselves.
The path to prosperity leads you onward. Travel south to more land, more wealth, lives of your own making.
As the glaciers receded what did they leave behind? Typically glacial moraine, rivers, crevases, valleys, waterfalls. A harsh climate for a braveheart, but travel and settle, they did. Onward, almighty man. To your own conquest, to your own challenge, to your own peace.
written by Dr. Louise Hayes
November 2, 2013

Early Man

Hail Bravehearts

Today is the day that dreams are made of. New life, new hope, new adventure, a daring new world of hope and promise. The bravest and the most daring venture forth to share the land with peoples of diligence and fortitude. A habituated land of congenial peoples who cleverly negotiated a peace amongst themselves for their own survival and mutual prosperity.
Hail, bravehearts, to come to this great land, this continent of the Americas, to build dreams, fortunes, life, liberty. A land worth fighting for, a freedom worth their daring lives. Come to the Americas! Venture forth to colonise!
The aboriginal peoples of the land accepted the new immigrants, generally with the quiet acceptance of negotiation and peaceful interchange.
Who were these early peoples? They saved so many lives with their skills and knowledge?
Where do you come from, you daring brave souls of the almighty human?

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Aboriginal_peoples_in_Canada

The historical evidence indicates a migration from Asia across the short straight which is now separating Russia from Alaska. Nomadic peoples following migrating animals crossed the land mass which joined Russia to Alaska, into the far north of continental North America.
12000 years of history of human habitation in Alaska. The receding glaciers allowed for human occupancy in a snow free Alaska. As the glaciers receded the early people migrated further south into a land now known as Canada. The aboriginal peoples have resided in this land for so long, thousands of years, that their cultural identity is with North America.
Today, they identify themselves as First Nations, the first peoples of Canada.

http://www.pc.gc.ca/eng/pn-np/yt/kluane/index.aspx

Into the land they came, through a new landscape carved from retreating glaciers. The land was immense, the obstacles difficult, the terrain sometimes impassable. Yet, the early settlers persisted in the wild north of unconquered land and pursued their fate to lands unknown. What was the call, oh brave heart? To satisfy the longing of curiosity, of adventure, of ambition? Nomadic peoples following game, in search of tribal lands, looking for peaceful relief from war faring neighbours? Survival in a land of mountains, ice and forest, with wit and cunning minds for survival. To overcome the climate, the landscape the wildlife and to live.
Bravo, brave hunter, to travel so far, to make this place your home. Through the massive tracts of northern wilderness to occupy territories of more habitable climate, the pressure to move on and to explore on continued. The human. The adventurer. The quest for exploration. Did they really come here merely to survive or was the daunting quest of pre history, the same quest of the human spirit as the driving force within us now? They could see that land, the continents were attached. It compels us. What lies beyond?
Oh great human, nothing goes unexplored. To travel across the land bridge out of necessity, out of curiosity, out of free will? To meet the challenge of adventure?
Gifted almighty human, with your strength and perseverance. Into the great land mass, to survive.
written by Dr. Louise Hayes
October 31, 2013

The landing

Good morning brave hearts

The voyage is long and the spirit becomes weary. The choice to venture forth into the unknown was a difficult one. The hardship obvious. The stalwarts of the new regime were pensive. What lies beyond?
A small group of people cast out from the shore. These waters have been charted before. Ships have crossed the oceans for hundreds of years, the path is straight. Straight to land hundreds of kilometers away. A large land mass that can’t be missed. Straight across!
In the looming doom of their choice, they cast off. Adrift now, unto the seas.
The choice was a perilous decision wrought from conflicts of ideology which couldn’t be resolved. Freedom called in their minds. Freedom to practice an ideology of their choice. Freedom from the constant explanation, the constant rebuke, the constant struggle. To worship in their own way in a land of freedom without discrimination. Yes, there is such a land and the heavy load of the high seas is upon them.
102 people set forth on that day in two vessels. Only one survived the voyage, only 65 people survived the first winter.

http://biblescripture.net/Pilgrims.html

The good fortune of the pilgrims was to land in a continent of generous peoples. A peoples who generally accepted the tired outcasts. A peoples who allowed the landing of so few, who had starved and perished at sea, who’s numbers were cut in half, who arrived alone. Weary travellers in need of kindness.

http://www.history.com/this-day-in-history/the-pilgrim-wampanoag-peace-treaty

The peoples of the new world made room for the new colonialists and participated in their survival. Oh fortunate travellers to encounter the compassionate, moral human, the peacemaker and the peacekeeper. A small group of weary adventurers, but strangers still.
Hail, almighty human, for the acts of kindness and caring. For only a few short years ago, your populations were devastated by disease from some of these same sorts of travellers. Weary and beleaguered they carried smallpox which spread amongst the natives and devastated their peoples. Death to many.
Still the courage to seek peaceful alliance runs strong in the mind and the will for a lasting peace encourages negotiation. Yes, there will be a negotiated peace. Yes, there will be survival and a colony in this new land.
Brave adventurers, whose toil and passions brought them to this end. New land, new peoples, new survival, new prosperity.
Hail to you, almighty human, for the great adventure of your lives. For dreams and for daring, you live forever!
written by Dr. Louise Hayes
October 25, 2013