Let Them Eat Pie

Let Them Eat Pie

Hail almighty ones

Let them eat pie.  These almost famous words evoke memories of lives past.  What could possibly be wrong with pie?  The nutritious blend of wheat, to help you with your daily fibre.  The addition of fruit, full of vitamins, topped with your favorite antioxidants, like blueberry or raspberry.  Pie for breakfast.  The perfect way to start your day.  Granola with berries, farm fresh and organic, vitamins, vitamins, vitamins.

The great planet has given us a full larder this year, a bumper crop of berries, fruit from the trees and a delicious side line of rose hips for jam.  The nutritional value of the backyard larder is immense.  Add to this the buckets of blueberries, offered wild by the roadside and you’ve scored your nutritional elements for the winter.  The buzz word this year is anti-oxidant.  Cancer fighting gems of gold, to keep your body healthy and fit.  Keep your body disease free.  Those minuscule plantings of organic berries, hold the key to keeping your body in top form, for fighting the ravages of some serious disease.

http://www.webmd.com/food-recipes/features/10-super-foods#1

And this was yester world, in a time long past, before those deadly diseases were born.  In a time of the homesteader, before trucking and before pesticides, before genetically engineered product, before big business farming and before the mass marketing and mass advertising.  A time of the corner grocery store, the marketplace, the roadside fruit stand.  There was a time, when entire nations fed themselves and the word organic, was taken for granted.  All food was organic.  No pesticides, no preservatives, no artificial sweeteners or coloring.  A time before plastic, when food was packed in cardboard boxes and wrapped in paper, a time when farm fresh goodness was common place.  Dangerous illnesses like cancer, were not as commonplace.

What is the key?  What is the factor that changes this?  Is it just our lives and our lifestyle?  The stress level or the pollution index.  Factors out of our control, or something more significant, some thing that we can control and that only we, ourselves can take charge of.  In those bygone years of yesterday, the family diet was quite different.  Granola with berries, easy to make. Full of freshness and packed with nutrients.  The larder was full, the canning season taken seriously, put your crops down, fill the pantry, make your preserves.  Diet is crucial to maintaining a healthy body.  Your diet can save you. It can boost your immune system and fight the diseases.  It can help you maintain body weight and skin tone, muscle firmness and shiny hair.  Your diet can make your eyes sparkle and your body spring with life.  Your diet helps you to live long and to live well.  Your perfect body, your perfect diet, a blend of common sense and lifestyle.

Eat your way to your good health and plant your garden with seeds of goodness and the love of living.  This is where your heart is, body and soul, literally.

Written by Dr. Louise Hayes

October 3, 2016

Advertisements
Prayers for the People

Prayers for the People

Hail, oh brilliant ones

From the minds of the common man, the culmination of skills and knowledge to survive in the cold, white winter.  Plant your crops, harvest your gold, smell the sweet scent of success.  The smiles of surpassing years of struggle, the world is won, the population is rising, the connection has been met.  Sow the seeds of prosperity, in the soil, in your minds, in the community and in the cultural exchange.   Tips of survival that heal the body, heal the mind and mend the sorrow.  Live you awesome stalwarts.  Live and let live, to soar in this land of plenty.

By royal decree the brides arrive, about 800 in total.   By royal decree, they marry and they stay.  No more visiting and making the decision to stay, only to return to France because the colony is too rustic.  Now there are families and sighs of relief.  Mutual sharing, caring and helpfulness, homes and companionship, comfort and joy.  The blessings of a child, the good work of the hospital.  The population starts to rise.  In 1663 the population of New France is merely 3200 strong and hearty souls.  In ten years time, the population doubles, to 6700 in 1672.  From the humble beginnings of 26 in 1608, to rise to a population of 6700 , sixty eight years later, in 1672.

http://www.lookbackward.com/perrault/filleroi/  The Kings Daughters,  Filles de Roi

The success of the Kings Daughters was mainly due to the origins of the women.  Peasant girls for the countryside were more well suited to the rigors of life in the colony, than girls from the towns.  Make your own bread, pick your own berries, harvest your own crops, feed the animals, milk the cow.  The country girls had more life skills than their counterparts in the city and could manage the hard work better, with more knowledge and more skills to their credit. Mainly rural people, from the farm.  People who understand animals, crops, weather, soil.  Hardworking people, who know how to plant seeds and preserve food.

The small population of Quebecois in Canada is finally starting to rise.  These women were needed to prevent incest and to finally ensure a that the small group of people, living in that far off land, would actually survive and become a people of their own.

Cast off into the colonies, with wits and courage to save them, they will work hard for their living and persist in developing the land and the character of the people who dwell their. They will have their babies and change the world.  With the developing colony comes a people of ingenuity.  Inventions of their own.  Negotiations of their own.  An existence that becomes a life of unexpected chance.  Maple syrup and horse racing.  Unique and unknown in some circles, becomes a part of life.  A chance for joy.

With prayers for the people, the nation is developing well.

written by Dr. Louise Hayes

September 15, 2016

We Got What We Asked For

Hail Bravehearts

Necessity is the mother of invention, they say, so invent away, oh brilliant ones.  We need your intelligent, focused minds.  The land is lush and forested, the ways of the new world are forming.  Unique culture, unique people, united through a necessity to survive.  The harshness is surpassed, the colony if finally a reality, a town, a community, a people of strength and character.  A new world to be proud of, a new colony to call home.  Safety and security, faith heals all.

This new destiny brings hope for longevity, wealth in adversity, dreams to fulfill and lives to share.  More happiness, more health, more survival,  more life.  A community starting to thrive and a prosperity starting to emerge.  Now the world changes and with new life, new skills emerge.  Challenges are overcome and ideas form and are listened to. Hail, oh brave ones, enter the invention.

A small effort, to bread a horse.  Commonplace and casual.  No one thinks twice about it.  So there’s a mare and there’s a stallion and a farmer needs a foal.  But this is a different world, a world of constant work.  That necessary animal needs to be changed.  Tweek those muscles, change that stature, increase that stamina.  We need a workhorse, an iron maiden, a horse of steel to work all day, to  ride on, to show with, to jump with, to teach our children to ride on.  We need a smaller horse, one that doesn’t eat too much, but well muscled for the work at hand.  We need an well rounded animal, that we can use for anything.  Work in the fields, pull a cart, take a day off for a ride on.   Please give us such an animal.  The king has sent many horses, try an experiment, fulfill our wishes, see what you can do.

And so it comes to pass.  From the breading stock of the King of France, comes several different breeds to consider.  Perhaps the Andalusian, maybe the Barb, an Arabian, a Norman, a Breton  and a draft horse.  All animals of superior breeding, all animals of quality and perfected genetics.  Each of these breeds has character and worth of it’s own.  Now, for the outcome that we desire, pick the perfect matches.

http://www.chhaps.org/breedinfo.htm  the Canadian Horse

From fine bloodlines and carefully selected breeding, comes the horse of their dreams.  Sturdy and capable, strong and even tempered.  A horse for all occasions.  Breeding their own, gives them rights, superiority of aptitude, distinction of intellect.  A breed made to order, an invention of necessity.  A work horse, a riding horse, a unique horse.  Well done, oh awesome human, to conjure up the animal of your needs.  Well done, oh early homesteader, to support your survival in such a unique way.  A new horse, and a beauty!  Hail to you, and the Canadian.

Written by Dr. Louise Hayes

September 4, 2016

The grand dictator

Good morning Brave hearts!

Colour your world to the dictates of fashion. An array of beauty unfolds to greet you. The grand master of influence and adventure. A call to the superior mind, to the inferior will, to the jealous and the courageous, to be spoiled and to secumb, to the master of human destiny, to be fated and ill fated, for necessity, for income, for prosperity and for nation building.
Fashion!
The word echoes in the ears of centuries old man. The fine garments, the decorative interiors, the gilted gold and bejeweled ornaments. The fun of the grandeur, the privilege of the covering, the daring to be individualized and the refreshing outlook of a different approach.
Hail, great human! Come to the wild! Here is where all destiny awaits. In business and trade, in negotiation and marriage, in adventure and lifestyle. Come, live your lives in the great Canadian north, where the dictator surrounds you and compels your compliance. Look to the forest, almighty human, there is the answer to your needs.
The aboriginal peoples of Canada clothed themselves in the finest and most sought after garments in the world at the time. Fur and leather are the trademark of their apparel. Hunting and trapping are the trademarks of their lives.
The bountiful forest and the open tundra yield animal life by the thousands. The daring lives of the bold northern hunter as he skillfully sets his trap line and waits in eager anticipation of the dollars to come. The stealthy hunter who stalks a prey of fleet footed wild for food and for fur. What brings you here, oh brave hearts, to settle in the remote far north? A land of danger and destitution for most. A land of changes and peril.
Cloak yourselves like kings. The seal gives up hides of waterproof warmth, for snugly insulated footwear, warm and impermeable. No dampness there, no winters chill, no ice cube toes or frostbitten feet. A necessity of an age gone by, where warm mukluks, kept us warm and dry. A coat of caribou, deer or bear. For centuries old man clothed himself in the finest cloth that man could find, fur.
Bejeweled in feathers, claws and teeth, bone for knives and ornamentation, the life of the land drew the cunning and daring, the strong and agile, the persistent and healthy. The clever craftsman of ingenuity and necessity, created a culture, a life, a world of their own.
Drawn to the hunt, by need or adventure, the northern man is a rightful settler. The need for the wild, as it gives up it’s treasure, is returned in the dutiful knowledge that waste is intolerable. All parts must be used, in meat, in fur, in bone, in teeth. The wild gives up their lives so sparingly, that precious gift must not be wasted.
Cloak yourselves in fur and feather, leather and hides from hats to boots, to mitts to coats, to pant and shirts.
Oh great dictator, you dress so well, for fashion calls us from our warm abode to venture out into the cold, to the north, to Canada, to settle and trade and to become the nation that we are. The nation of the fur trade.

This clip is about building an igloo, but look at their traditional garments!
written by Dr. Louise Hayes
January 17, 2014

The Case, page 3

Good morning, almighty human

The adventure of this day, is the adventure of our lives. Brilliant people, from far off places looked at this land with joy. A destiny awaits. A life of more than survival, more than hard work, more than toil and struggle. A life of promise, of achieving potential, of security, of freedom! A colony awaits the brave.
Venture forth, almighty ones. You have chosen the path to a destiny in a land of harsh climate and short growing season. Strength to you, brave ones, for your duty calls and you aspire. Come! Calls the great land and your ears hear the call and your mind sours with imagination and knowledge. Come to this great land and call this colony your home.
And so they came. Brave pioneers, farmers, homesteaders, settlers, bringing with them all of their skills, their training, their knowledge, their strength, their aptitude and their passion. A goal in mind. To settle the vast land and to make it their home.
Praises! Praises for the adventure of your lives and praises still for the enduring negotiation of the nation.
The livestock they brought with them were the wonderful animals whose tough genetics would survive in a land of harsh winters. Heritage breeds of livestock with superior capability of survival in this land.
Strong, independent people, with courage and foresight. Build a nation, was the rallying call. To nationhood they came.
The wild was cleared and the livestock set out to pasture. Excitement and apprehension fills the air. All of the hard work and endless planning must have the expected results. No losses, no agony, no harsh reality. Only the endless call to build, to dream, to prosperity. Only the endless call to colonize, to pursue the dream, to be daring and to venture. We cannot fail.
The livestock are a superior breed. Tough and adaptive, like their human masters. A strong and hearty creature with superior characteristics and genetics. In the sheep, superior wool and meat.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=UfKwQs6DBQ0 = Shropshire sheep

The family farm was fairly small, only enough land that could be cleared and maintained. Enough land to sustain them and then to push them further into prosperity. Well kept land with fertile soil and manageable crops. A lifetime of dreams to pursue. A lifeline to freedom and security. Pastures were cleared and fences erected to keep the great wild at bay.
The livestock adapted, became contented and reproduced healthy offspring. Now prosperity is possible. That being over 170 years ago and still the same strain of animals. The same genetic blood, the heritage breed of yesteryear, still producing their healthy offspring today. These belong to us. They belong to our genetic strains registered here. A breed of rare, heritage sheep. Rare for this country, deserving our attention and protection.
Over a 170 years of careful breeding, four generations of careful family farming. Lifetimes of toil, careful selection. Knowledge, skill, training, education, planning, perseverance, travel, selection, work and work and work. The toil is endless, but the results impressive. Raise the bar! Set the standard high. Achieve the ultimate goal! The lavish praises earned for endless hours of work and perseverance. To you almighty man, for steadfast dedication to your craft. A National Historic site in your name.
Then, a mishap. Eh?
written by Dr. Louise Hayes
November 24, 2013

The Case, page 2

Peace to you almighty human. May you always be wise, with foresight, contemplation, care and giving. May you always look to the legacy of our cultural treasures with affection.
Our national heritage is a varied and diverse treasure. Stately homes, precious gardens, diverse landscapes, natural resources, intelligence, industry and cultural identity. A past of generosity, of peace, sharing and prosperity. It comes from work, from intelligence and from tenacity.
The land was productive, it enticed the farmer. Immigration was encouraged to a colony needing settlers, pioneers, homesteaders and farmers.

William Miller of Pickering Ontario was such a person. Straight from Scotland, he brought with him a desire for farming in 1839 and began a family business of farming including sheep. One of the breeds he brought to Canada was the Shropshire sheep. A sturdy, productive animal with a good woolen coat and good meat. Straight from the British Iles to the farmlands of Canada, four generations of the Miller family raised, traded, imported, sold and bread Shropshire sheep. A Canadian legacy in family farming that has lasted more than 170 years. In that time, the Canadian breeders have developed a strain of animal that has become the Canadian heritage breed of Shropshire sheep.

https://www.rbst.org.uk/sitemanager/uploads/ck_files/files/Shropshire%20-%20Fact%20Sheet(1).pdf

A fine and commendable achievement for a farmer of skills and intelligence. A breeding stock of superior animals to call his own. A family farm of such cultural legacy that it becomes a National Historic site.

http://www.historicplaces.ca/en/rep-reg/place-lieu.aspx?id=9632

More than 170 years of raising a heritage breed. Bloodlines, genetics, registries. record keeping. The meticulous work of selective breeding, preservation and control. Only the best, the finest, the purest strain of the stock. The constant attention, the details. For more than 170 years the perseverance to establish a blood line of genetically superior animals.
The Shropshire sheep is only a sheep, but for Canadian cultural heritage, these are ours. A rare breed of carefully selected genetics, which prove the sustainability of a lifetime of pioneering and generations of careful animal husbandry. Carefully selected animals, carefully selected genetics, perfect coats, perfect specimens, good meat. Sheep that eat grass, not grain, in a Canadian environment of long winters and heavy snowfall. An unusual diet in an animal that eventually lost their popularity to their grain fed counterparts. A small flock of significant cultural heritage. A flock of genetically pure animals of 170 years of Canadian farming history. A rare breed in Canada. A significant achievement in Canadian farming history.
The family farm has been our cultural history for hundreds of years. It has brought settlers and pioneers by the thousands to Canada to call this country home and to build a great colony and a great nation. The strength and fortitude of these skilled experts has carved a farming niche in a country of wild, wooded land.
There are a few significant examples remaining in our country, but 170 years is one of the longest surviving farms in this nation and the strain of livestock that it produced is cultural heritage as well.
Which takes us back to the Shropshire sheep and our case. Page 2
written by Dr. Louise Hayes
November 24, 2013